Aurora and reflection | Today’s Image | EarthSky

Photographer Tor-Ivar Næss posted this cool image of an aurora, saying:

The image is a duplicate of itself to make a perfect reflection for a square print.

Double Reflection of the Aurora
Double Reflection of the Aurora

See more photos by Tor-Ivar Næss

One of the first auroras of the new season, seen from Earth and space on August 19

via Aurora and reflection | Today’s Image | EarthSky.

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Eaten by the Milky Way!

NOTE: Another great little post explaining our grand universe…thanks!

Astronomy and Law

It is no secret that the Milky Way, our galaxy, is hungry.  Scientists believe that our galaxy has ingested at least two other galaxies.  New evidence of this has appeared again as scientists have discovered a stream of stars believed to be the remnant of an ancient star cluster slowly being eaten by the Milky Way.  The scientists used data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which has a vast treasure trove of information that scientists are slowly sifting through.

“The Milky Way is constantly gobbling up small galaxies and star clusters,” said Ana Bonaca, a Yale graduate student and lead author of a study forthcoming in Astrophysical Journal Letters. “The more powerful gravity of our Milky Way pulls these objects apart and their stars then become part of the Milky Way itself.”

Marla Geha, associate professor of astronomy at Yale and a co-author of the study and her team…

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Belated Happy World Space Week To Everyone! | Astronomy and Law

Space Week 2012

The the 13th annual week long international celebration of spaceflight and exploration ran from  Oct. 4 through today.  Both dates are key dates in the history of space exploration. On Oct. 4, 1957, the Soviet Union lofted Sputnik 1, humanity’s first-ever artificial satellite. And the Outer Space Treaty, which forms the basis for international space law, came into effect on Oct. 10, 1967.

via Belated Happy World Space Week To Everyone! | Astronomy and Law.

Discovery of gatekeeper nerve cells explains the effect of nicotine on learning and memory

ScienceDaily (Oct. 7, 2012) — Researchers at Uppsala University have, together with Brazilian collaborators, discovered a new group of nerve cells that regulate processes of learning and memory. These cells act as gatekeepers and carry a receptor for nicotine, which can explain our ability to remember and sort information. The discovery of the gatekeeper cells, which are part of a memory network together with several other nerve cells in the hippocampus, reveal new fundamental knowledge about learning and memory.

via Discovery of gatekeeper nerve cells explains the effect of nicotine on learning and memory.